MIDFIELDERS PROPEL SEVILLA TO FOURTH IN SCORING CHARTS

Read via Sevilla Fútbol Club’s ENglish-language website

Sevilla have scored the fourth most goals in La Liga with 58, behind Atlético in third with 60, Real Madrid in second (84) and Barcelona in first (94).

With 11 more goals to their name than in the entirety of last season, Sevilla are just two gaols shy of their total from 2014/15 when they recorded a record 76 points total in the best finish in their history

The midfielders in Sampaoli’s squad have been more prolific than strikers in front of goal this season, with 12 of the 19 La Liga wins this season having come from goals from midfielders, and defenders to a lesser extent.

The games won by goals from non-strikers are as follows: Betis (Mercado), Leganés (Franco Vázquez, Nasri and Sarabia), Atléticode Madrid (Nzonzi), Deportivo (Nzonzi, Vitolo and Mercado), Valencia CF (Pareja and own goal), Celta (Iborra hat trick), Osasuna (Iborra double, Franco Vázquez and Sarabia), Las Palmas (Correa), Eibar (Sarabia and Vitolo), Betis (Mercado and Iborra), AthleticClub (Iborra) and Granada (Ganso double).

Of the 58 goals that Sevilla have scored in the 2016/17 campaign, 31 have come from midfielders. The goals are as follows: Sarabia and Iborra 7; Vitolo 4; Corrrea and Franco Vázquez 3; Nasri, Nzonzi and Ganso 2; Kiyotake 1.

The four strikers have scored ten fewer goals, as follows: Ben Yedder 10; Vietto 6; Jovetic 4; Carlos Fernández 1. They are just two strikes away from equalling the 23 goals scored by Sevilla’s strikers last season and nine from the goals scored in 2014/15 by Bacca, Gameiro and Aspas.

These stats go against the trend at Atlético Madrid, whose forwards have scored at a considerably higher rate than their midfielders, with 31 strikes compared to Sevilla’s 21. Meanwhile, fifth-placed Villarreal’s statistics are similar to those of Sevilla. Their forwards have scored 23 goals while their midfielders have found the back of the net 21 times without any of their players reaching double figures to date.

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